This is the "Summary" page of the "Kinkajou (Potos flavus) Fact Sheet, 2015" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content
sdzglibrarybanner San Diego Zoo Global Library

Kinkajou (Potos flavus) Fact Sheet, 2015   Tags: animals, carnivores, fact sheets, mammals, san diego zoo, sdzg, wildlife  

Last Updated: Dec 2, 2015 URL: http://ielc.libguides.com/sdzg/factsheets/kinkajou Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

Summary Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Kinkajou (Potos flavus) Fact Sheet, 2015

Kinkajou

Image credit: San Diego Zoo Global. All Rights Reserved.

TaxonomyPhysical Characteristics

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Mammalia

Order: Carnivora

Suborder: Caniformia

Family: Procyonidae

Genus: Potos

Species: Potos flavus - kinkajou

Body Weight
1.4-4.6 kg (3.1-10.1 lb)

Body Length
Male: 390-542 mm (1.3-1.8 ft)
Female: 364-547 mm (1.2-1.8 ft)

Tail Length
Male: 420-570 mm (1.4-1.9 ft)
405-570 mm (1.3-1.9 ft)

Pelage: Short, shoft, wooly hair covers the body. Back golden brown; belly creamy yellow or orangish.

Distribution & StatusBehavior & Ecology

Range: Neotropical; southern Mexico to Bolivia.

Habitat: Inhabits closed canopy forests. Prefer undisturbed sites in mature stages of development.

IUCN Status: Least Concern version 3.1. Widely distributed and adaptable to a degree of human land-use change; no evidence of significant population declines.

CITES Appendix: Apprendix III for Honduras

Other Designations: Mexican Red List species; given special protection.

Population in Wild: No published estimates of population size; numbers are likely decreasing.

Locomotion: Jump and climb through the forest canopy. Highly adept and agile, the tail is often used to secure and balance the body when crossing gaps between supports.

Activity Cycle: Nocturnal; kinkajou sleep during the day and search for food at night. Nightly forays typically last for 8-11 hours and end prior to dawn.

Social Groups: Most often solitary, kinkajou are known to associate in small groups. Typical groups are composed of 1 female, her offspring, and 1-2 adult males.

Diet: Frugivores; fruit makes up 90% of the kinkajous' diet. Flowers, leaves, honey, nectar, and insects are also eaten.

Predators
Jaguar, puma, ocelot, Harpy and Isidor's eagles, and humans.

Reproduction & DevelopmentSpecies Highlights

Sexual Maturity: 1.5-2.2 yrs

Gestation: 98-120 days

Litter Size: 1 most typically; rarely 2

Interbirth Interval: c. 1 yr

Birth Weight: 150-200 g (0.33-0.44 lb)

Age at Weaning: c. 4 months

Longevity: In captivity, oldest individuals > 30 years

Feature Facts: A prehensile tail and other monkey-like features might mislead the casual observer (or even early well-known scientists) to confuse the kinkajou with a primate; in fact these curious creatures are more closely related to raccoons. This grasping tail helps individuals more easily through forest canopies in their Central and South American homes. Most often solitary, individuals forage for fruits at night and spend daylight hours at sleep in tree top dens. A female and her young are sometimes joined by one or more males; these small groupings often den together and may be seen feeding in close proximity to one another.

 

About This Fact Sheet

© 2015 San Diego Zoo Global. Updated January 2015.

How to cite: Kinkajou (Potos flavus) Fact Sheet, 2015. c2015. San Diego (CA): San Diego Zoo Global; [accessed YYYY MMM DD]. http://ielc.libguides.com/sdzg/factsheets/kinkajou. 
(note: replace YYYY MMM DD with date accessed, e.g., 2015 Sep 15)

Disclaimer: Although San Diego Zoo Global makes every attempt to provide accurate information, some of the facts provided may become outdated or replaced by new research findings. Questions and comments may be addressed to library@sandiegozoo.org.

 

Acknowledgments

Our most genuine thanks to Dr. Roland Kays for providing content review of this fact sheet. Roland is a zoologist with broad research interests. He is a recognized expert in his field and known for applying new technologies to study free-ranging animals. His work has provided valuable information on the lives of hard to study species including the kinkajou. Dr. Kays currently serves as Director of the Biodiversity Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and is a Research Associate Professor at North Carolina State University.

SDZG Library Links

Our Mission. The Library is dedicated to supporting San Diego Zoo Global’s mission by providing outstanding
information resources and research services to advance knowledge and strengthen our organization’s capacity to save
species worldwide. Our Vision. We will empower San Diego Zoo Global to lead the fight against extinction by serving as
the organization’s information hub and facilitating research of the highest quality.


© 2016 San Diego Zoo Global — All Rights Reserved

Our Family of Sites

  • Zoo logoSan Diego Zoo
  • Park logoSan Diego Zoo Safari Park
  • ICR logoSan Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research
  • SDZ Global logoSan Diego Zoo Global
Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip